Monday, August 15, 2022

What to Do If You Were Exposed to COVID-19

Received this email from a friend? Sign up now

CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
August 15, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Graphic of COVID-19 Antigen Self-Test kit

What to Do If You Were Exposed to COVID-19


If you were exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19 or have been told by a healthcare provider or public health authority that you were exposed, there are steps that you should take, regardless of your vaccination status or if you have had a previous infection.

Steps include:
  • Watch for symptoms for 10 days
  • Wear a mask around others indoors for 10 days
  • Test 5 days after exposure, or sooner if you have symptoms
  • If you test positive, follow isolation guidance
  • Take extra precautions for 10 days when around people more likely to get very sick

Illustration of family practicing isolation.

Isolation and Precautions for People with COVID-19


If you have COVID-19, you can spread the virus to others. Regardless of vaccination status, you should isolate from others. You should also isolate if you are sick and suspect that you have COVID-19 but do not yet have test results.
If you test positive for COVID-19, stay home for at least 5 days and isolate from others in your home. You are likely most infectious during these first 5 days.
  • Wear a high-quality mask if you must be around others at home and in public.
  • Do not go places where you are unable to wear a mask.
  • Do not travel.
  • Stay home and separate from others as much as possible.
  • Use a separate bathroom, if possible.
  • Take steps to improve ventilation at home, if possible.
  • Don’t share personal household items, like cups, towels, and utensils.
  • Monitor your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign (like trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately.

It is important to also understand when to end isolation and when to stop wearing a mask.

CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review, Friday August 12, 2022 - Health Equity and Vaccines - Find the latest data in CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review - Subscribe: bit.ly/CDTsubscribe

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


CDC is committed to making sure everyone has access to COVID-19 vaccines. Learn more about vaccine equity in this week’s COVID Data 

COVID-19 Community Levels


CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.



U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Monday, July 25, 2022

Novavax COVID-19 Vaccine

Received this email from a friend? Sign up now

CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
July 25, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Picture of woman with bandage.

Novavax COVID-19 Vaccine


CDC has endorsed the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ (ACIP) recommendation that Novavax’s COVID-19 vaccine be used as another primary series option for adults ages 18 years and older.

Novavax is a protein subunit vaccine. These vaccines package harmless proteins of the COVID-19 virus alongside another ingredient called an adjuvant that helps the immune system respond to the virus in the future.

Vaccines using protein subunits have been used for more than 30 years in the United States, beginning with the first licensed hepatitis B vaccine. Other protein subunit vaccines used in the United States today include those to protect against influenza and whooping cough.

Two doses of Novavax are given in the primary series, 3–8 weeks apart. People who are moderately or severely immunocompromised should also receive 2 doses, given 3 weeks apart (a 3rd primary dose is not currently authorized).

Novavax COVID-19 vaccine is not authorized for use as a booster dose.

Illustration of a checklist on a tablet.

V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker


Use your smartphone to tell CDC how you, or your dependent, feel after getting any dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Your participation in V-safe helps CDC monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines for everyone.

V-safe provides personalized and confidential health check-ins via text messages and web surveys so you can quickly and easily share with CDC how you, or your dependent, feel after getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

V-safe features:
  • Enrolling is fast and easy! Sign up during the waiting period after you get any dose of COVID-19 vaccine or at any time after vaccination
  • Add a dependent and complete health check-ins on their behalf
  • Enter and report how you, or your dependent, feel after first, second, additional, and booster doses
  • Available in multiple languages including English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese
CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review, Friday July 22, 2022 - Learn About Booster Rates in Your County - Find the latest data in CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review - Subscribe: bit.ly/CDTsubscribe

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


Staying up to date on COVID-19 vaccines, including boosters, offers the best protection against severe COVID-19. However, millions of people in the U.S. eligible for boosters have not gotten theirs.

COVID-19 Community Levels


CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.



U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Monday, July 18, 2022

Know Your COVID-19 Community Level

Received this email from a friend? Sign up now

CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
July 18, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Map of COVID-19 Community Levels.

Know Your COVID-19 Community Level


COVID-19 Community Levels help communities decide what prevention steps to take based on the latest data. Levels can be low, medium, or high and are determined by looking at hospital beds being used, hospital admissions, and the total number of new COVID-19 cases in an area.

With high levels of population immunity from both vaccination and infections, the risk of medically significant disease, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19 is greatly reduced for most people. Some people and communities, such as our oldest citizens, people who are immunocompromised, and people with disabilities, are at higher risk for serious illness and face challenging decisions navigating a world with COVID-19.

COVID-19 Community Levels and recommended prevention steps are reported by county, with data updated weekly.

Illustration of family wearing masks.

COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention


People who are up to date on vaccines have much lower risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19 compared with unvaccinated people.

When making decisions about preventive behaviors in addition to vaccination, consider the COVID-19 Community Level in your county.

Layered prevention strategies — like staying up to date on vaccines, ventilation, and wearing masks — can help limit severe disease and reduce the potential for strain on the healthcare system.

People may choose to mask at any time. People with symptoms, a positive test, or exposure to someone with COVID-19 should wear a mask. Masks are recommended in indoor public transportation settings and may be required in other places by local or state authorities.
CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review, Friday July 15, 2022 - Act Now on Second Boosters - Find the latest data in CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review - Subscribe: bit.ly/CDTsubscribe

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


People ages 50 years and older should get a second COVID-19 vaccine booster, but fewer than 1 in 3 who is eligible has. If you are 50+, talk to your healthcare provider about how to stay up to date on your COVID-19 vaccines.

COVID-19 Community Levels


CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.



U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

What to Do If You Were Exposed to COVID-19

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...