Tuesday, October 20, 2020

8 Things to Know about Vaccine Planning

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October 20, 2020
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
lab assistant with mask and rubber gloves holding test tubes

8 Things to Know about Vaccine Planning 

There is currently no authorized or approved vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the United States; however, the U.S. government’s Operation Warp Speed program has been working since the pandemic started to make a COVID-19 vaccine available as soon as possible. There may be a limited supply of COVID-19 vaccines before the end of 2020. If there is limited supply, some groups may be recommended to get a COVID-19 vaccine first. Find out the 8 things you need to know about vaccine planning. 

illustration of lady coughing and mask stopping droplets with the words cloth barrier

Considerations for Wearing Masks

CDC recommends that you wear masks in public settings around people who don’t live in your household and when you can’t stay 6 feet away from others. Masks help stop the spread of COVID-19 to others.  This recommendation is based on what we know about the role respiratory droplets play in the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19, paired with emerging evidence from clinical and laboratory studies showing masks reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth. COVID-19 spreads mainly among people who are within about 6 feet of one another, so the use of masks is particularly important in settings where social distancing is hard to maintain. 

tourist woman with mask using phone and sitting

Travel during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Travel increases your chances of getting and spreading COVID-19. Your chances of getting COVID-19 while traveling also depend on whether you and those around you take steps to protect yourself and others, such as wearing masks and staying 6 feet away from people outside your household. Airports, bus stations, train stations, and rest stops are all places travelers can be exposed to the virus in the air and on surfaces. These are also places where it can be hard to keep your distance from others. In general, the longer you are around a person with COVID-19, the more likely you are to get infected. 

image of How to Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19 poster

Test for Current Infection

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. People who have symptoms of COVID-19, people who have been within 6 feet of someone with confirmed COVID-19 for a total of at least 15 minutes, and people who have been asked or referred by a healthcare provider may need to be tested for COVID-19. If you do get tested, you should stay home until you get your test results and follow the advice of your health care provider or a public health professional. If you test negative for COVID-19, it means you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing, or that your sample was collected too early in your infection. If you have symptoms later, you may need another test to determine if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. Remember, you can be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and then get infected and spread the virus to others. 

mask, part of keyboard and hand sanitizer on desk

How to Protect Yourself and Others in the Workplace

If you have or think you have symptoms, or have tested positive for COVID-19, stay home and find out what to do if you are sick and when you can be around others. If you are well, but you have a sick family member or recently had close contact with someone with COVID-19, notify your supervisor and follow CDC-recommended precautions. Other steps to protect yourself and others include monitoring your health and being alert for symptoms, and wearing a mask in public settings. 

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

As of October 20, 2020

In the United States, there have been 8,188,585 confirmed cases of COVID-19 detected through U.S. public health surveillance systems in 50 states and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Northern Marianas Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands. 

CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Tips for Trick or Treating and Other Halloween Activities

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October 13, 2020
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
illustration of two children in costumes with arrow between them and words 6 feet apart

Tips for Trick or Treating and Other Halloween Activities

Traditional Halloween activities are fun, but some can increase the risk of getting or spreading COVID-19 or flu. CDC has a new webpage that features new ways of trick or treating and other Halloween activities. When trick or treating or participating in other Halloween activities with people outside your household, wear a mask. You can make it fun by making your mask part of your costume, but when it comes to slowing the spread of COVID-19, a costume mask is not a substitute for a cloth mask. Also, do not wear a costume mask over a cloth mask. It can make breathing more difficult. 

illustration of a child wearing a wizard costume washing their hands

Steps to Take When Trick-or-Treating

If you’re heading out to trick-or-treat this year, or planning to put candy out for trick-or-treaters, remember to avoid direct contact with trick-or-treaters and give treats away outdoors if possible. Set up a station with individually bagged treats for kids to take, wash hands before handling treats, and wear a mask. 

illustration of adults and children participating in a Halloween costume parade

Steps to Take for Other Halloween Activities 

You can enjoy Halloween activities while taking steps to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. If you’re planning to participate in activities like decorating and carving pumpkins; visiting an orchard, forest or corn maze; attending an outdoor scavenger hunt; or hosting an outdoor costume party, remember to wear a mask, stay at least 6 feet from others who do not live with you, and wash your hands frequently. 

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

As of October 13, 2020

In the United States, there have been 7,787,548 confirmed cases of COVID-19 detected through U.S. public health surveillance systems in 50 states and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Northern Marianas Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands. 

CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Monday, October 5, 2020

What to Remember When Hosting Gatherings

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October 05, 2020
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
a doctor in PPE checking a patient's fever reading

Emergency Warning Signs of COVID-19

If you notice any of these emergency warning signs for COVID-19, seek emergency medical care immediately:

• Trouble breathing
• Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
• New confusion
• Inability to wake or stay awake
• Bluish lips or face.
This list doesn’t include all possible symptoms. Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.
stay home, stay safe

Stay Home if You Might Have Been Exposed to COVID-19

People who have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 should stay home (quarantine) unless they’ve already had COVID-19 within the past 3 months. You were in close contact if you were within 6 feet of someone who has COVID-19 for a total of 15 minutes or more, you provided care at home to someone who is sick with COVID-19, you had direct physical contact with the person (hugged or kissed them), you shared eating or drinking utensils, or someone sneezed, coughed, or somehow got respiratory droplets on you.

a doctor in PPE holding up a lung xray

Long-Term Effects of COVID-19

As the pandemic unfolds, CDC is learning more about the many organs besides the lungs that are affected by COVID-19. One of the health effects that CDC is closely working to understand relates to COVID-19 and the heart. Heart conditions associated with COVID-19 include inflammation and damage to the heart muscle itself, known as myocarditis, or inflammation of the covering of the heart, known as pericarditis. The risk of heart damage may not be limited to older and middle-aged adults. For example, young adults with COVID-19, including athletes, can also suffer from myocarditis.
coronavirus travel restriction airport sign

Travel During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19 and staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Before you travel, consider whether COVID-19 is spreading at your destination. The more cases at your destination, the more likely you are to get infected during travel and spread the virus to others when you return. If you do travel, take steps to protect yourself and others during your trip including wearing a mask, avoiding close contact, washing your hands often, and avoiding contact with anyone who’s sick.

halloween cookies

What to Remember When Hosting Gatherings This Holiday Season

If you’re planning on hosting a gathering over the holidays, remind guests to stay home if they’re sick or have been exposed to COVID-19 in the last 14 days. Host the gathering outdoors, when possible, and make sure indoor spaces are well-ventilated (for example, open a window). Arrange tables and chairs to allow for social distancing among people not in the same household. Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from people or indoors, and encourage guests to bring their own food.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

As of October 05, 2020

In the United States, there have been 7,396,730 confirmed cases of COVID-19 detected through U.S. public health surveillance systems in 50 states and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Northern Marianas Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands. 

CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

8 Things to Know about Vaccine Planning

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...