Monday, February 22, 2021

Key Things to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
February 22, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
illustrations of vaccine, person wearing a mask, hand washing, and social distancing

Key Things to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines

Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Experts also think that getting a COVID-19 vaccine may help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19. But while COVID-19 vaccines can keep you from getting sick, scientists are still learning how well vaccines prevent you from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to others. So even after vaccination, we need to continue using all the tools available to help stop this pandemic as we learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work in real-world conditions. Although the vaccine supply is currently limited, the federal government is working toward making vaccines widely available. 


Grey map of the USA

Variants of the Virus that Causes COVID-19

Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally. These variants seem to spread more easily and quickly than other variants, which may lead to more cases of COVID-19. An increase in the number of cases will put more strain on healthcare resources, lead to more hospitalizations, and potentially more deaths. So far, studies suggest that antibodies generated through vaccination with currently authorized vaccines recognize these variants. This is being closely investigated and more studies are underway. Prevention strategies like vaccination, social distancing, use of masks, hand hygiene, and isolation and quarantine are essential to limit the spread of COVID-19 and protect public health. 


counties of the United States in different shades of blue and teal

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review 

CDC’s new COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review combines images, analysis, and interpretations of key data and trends to keep you up to date on the pandemic and understand the data. 


Infographic image Variant Update

Variant Update: New virus variants that spread more easily could lead to a rapid rise in COVID-19 cases A Minnesota investigation found: Less travel less spread fewer cases

New Data Show Ongoing Need for Prevention  

Data published last week in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) and Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) highlight how new COVID-19 variants are spreading. These data show the ongoing need for proven prevention strategies to limit the impact of these variants. To slow the spread, everyone should

  • Wear a well-fitting mask.
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from people who don’t live with them.
  • Avoid crowds, gatherings, and poorly ventilated spaces.
  • Postpone travel.
  • Wash their hands often.
  • Get a vaccine when it’s available to them.


Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

February 22, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 27,938,085 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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Tuesday, February 16, 2021

Your Guide to Masks

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
February 16, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
mask with close up showing tightly woven cloth

Improve How Your Mask Protects You

When choosing a mask, look at how well it fits, how well it filters the air, and how many layers it has. Make sure your mask fits snugly against your face. Gaps can let air with respiratory droplets leak in and out around the edges of the mask. Pick a mask with layers to keep your respiratory droplets in and others’ out. A mask with layers will stop more respiratory droplets getting inside your mask or escaping from your mask if you are sick. 


illustration of how to layer masks with disposable mask underneath AND cloth mask on top

Types of Masks

There are many types of masks you can use to protect yourself and others from getting and spreading COVID-19. Cloth masks can be made from a variety of fabrics, and many types of cloth masks are available. Do not wear cloth masks with exhalation valves or vents, single layer or masks made of thin fabric that don’t block light. Disposable face masks are widely available. Do not wear disposable masks with gaps around the sides of the face or nose, or if wet or dirty.


illustration of child wearing mask and waving

Your Guide to Masks

Wear a mask correctly and consistently for the best protection. Be sure to wash your hands or use hand sanitizer before putting on a mask and do not touch the mask when wearing it. If you have to often touch/adjust your mask, it doesn’t fit you properly, and you may need to find a different mask or make adjustments. 


image of two lab workers in ppe holding vaccine bottles forward

Virtual National Forum on COVID-19 Vaccine 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is organizing a virtual National Forum on COVID-19 Vaccine to take place February 22-24, 2021. The Forum is intended for practitioners focused on vaccine implementation, as well as people and groups that can champion vaccine uptake in communities. 


Registration closes February 16, 2021. 



Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

February 16, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 27,542,421 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Monday, February 8, 2021

Masks Protect You & Me

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
February 8, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Image of people wearing masks with text 

It’s a two-way street, Masks protect you & me, When we all wear masks, we take care of each other, Wear masks, avoid crowds, stay 6 feet apart, and wash your hands, Take all four steps for the most protection

Masks Protect You & Me

Masks are an additional step to help prevent people from getting and spreading COVID-19. They provide a barrier that keeps respiratory droplets from spreading. Masks are a two way street and protect you and me. When we all wear masks, we take care of each other and everyone is protected.


Take these 4 steps for the most protection.

  • Wear masks
  • Stay 6 feet apart
  • Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated places
  • Wash your hands


Image of a persons hands using hand sanitizer

How to Select and Use Hand Sanitizer

To prevent the spread of germs, including COVID-19, CDC recommends washing hands with soap and water whenever possible. If soap and water are not readily available, using a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol can help you avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others. Properly apply alcohol-based sanitizer by rubbing the gel over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry.

Do Not

  • Rinse or wipe off the alcohol-based hand sanitizer before it’s dry
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer to clean surfaces
  • Store alcohol-based hand sanitizer above 105°F
  • Swallow alcohol-based hand sanitizers


Image of two couples socially distanced outside watching a movie

Large Gatherings

If you plan to attend a large gathering, those held outdoors are safer than indoor gatherings. Stay home if you are sick or have been near someone who thinks they may have or have been exposed to COVID-19. Here are some safer ways to enjoy events.

  • Attend a virtual concert or show with friends and family
  • Host a virtual family party or reunion
  • Watch a sporting event with people you live with
  • Attend online conferences instead of in person events
  • Attend a drive-in event
  • Attend a virtual religious ceremony or celebration
  • Wear masks at all times except when you are actively eating or drinking.


Image of a guest at door with basket of food and wine

Small Gatherings 

Gathering virtually or with the people you live with is the safest choice. If you do gather with people who don’t live with you, gatherings and activities held outdoors are safer than indoor gatherings. Everyone should take these steps to make the gatherings safer.

  • Have conversations with the host ahead of time to understand expectations for celebrating together
  • Bring your own food, drinks, plates, cups, utensils, and condiment packets
  • Wear a mask indoors and outdoors
  • Avoid shouting, cheering loudly, or singing
  • Stay home if you are sick or have been near someone who thinks they may have or have been exposed to COVID-19


Image of a mother and son baking valentine's day cookies

Have a Safer Valentine's Day

The safest way to celebrate Valentine’s Day is gathering virtually or with people who live with you.

  • Make Valentine cards or decorations and drop them off to loved ones
  • Take a walk with your Valentine
  • Celebrate with loved ones virtually
  • Prepare a special meal or dessert
  • Plan a special movie or game night
  • Have a picnic outside


Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

February 8, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 26,852,809 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Which COVID-19 Vaccine?

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...