Tuesday, March 28, 2023

Improve Ventilation at Home

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
March 28, 2023
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Friends conversing in living room.

Improve Ventilation at Home


Improving ventilation at home can help protect you and others from getting and spreading COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses.

Here are some ways you can improve ventilation in your home:
  • Bring as much fresh, outdoor air into your home as possible—for example, open windows
  • Consider using a portable air cleaner
  • Use fans to improve air flow
CDC’s interactive tool can help you see how much you can improve ventilation in your home.

Airplane flying during the day.

Protect Yourself and Others During Travel


If you’re traveling this spring, take action to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses:


  • Stay up to date on COVID-19 vaccines, including an updated booster
  • Wear a high-quality mask or respirator in indoor public transportation settings
  • Delay travel on public transportation when you’re sick


Learn about requirements and recommendations for domestic and international travel.

Illustration of patient after receiving a shots.

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


Put “make a pediatrician appointment” on top of your spring to-do list.


Regular checkups provide the opportunity to prevent, screen for, and manage chronic conditions, and to get routine vaccinations for your kids, including COVID-19 vaccines.


Your pediatrician can explain vaccine guidance and help make sure that your child is up to date. Learn more in the COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review.

COVID-19 Community Levels

CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.

U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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Wednesday, March 1, 2023

Have a COVID-19 Plan

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
March 1, 2023
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Illustration of woman using a laptop.

Have a COVID-19 Plan


Talk with your healthcare provider about whether you are at high risk of getting very sick from COVID-19.

People who are more likely to get very sick include older adults (ages 50 years or more, with risk increasing with age), people who are unvaccinated, and people with certain medical conditions, such as chronic lung disease, heart disease, or a weakened immune system.

Build your personal plan now by downloading COVID-19 Plan – available in English and Spanish. Edit and save your plan, and share it with your family, friends, and healthcare provider.

illustration of a medicine bottle and a perscription

Know Your Treatment Options


If you test positive for COVID-19 and are more likely to get very sick, treatments are available that can reduce your chances of hospitalization and death.


People who are more likely to get very sick include older adults (ages 50 years or more, with risk increasing with age), people who are unvaccinated, and people with certain medical conditions, such as chronic lung disease, heart disease, or a weakened immune system.


Medications to treat COVID-19 must be prescribed by a healthcare provider and started as soon as possible after diagnosis to be effective. The Treatment Locator (hhs.gov) can help you find a location that offers testing and treatment or a pharmacy where you can fill your prescription.


illustration of a person in a wheelchair, a person with an oxygen tank, an elderly person with a walker, and a person in a hospital bed

People Who Are Immunocompromised


Some people who are immunocompromised (have a weakened immune system) are more likely to get sick with COVID-19 or be sick for a longer period. People can be immunocompromised either due to a medical condition or from receipt of immunosuppressive medications or treatments.


If you or someone you live or spend time with is immunocompromised, it is important to have a COVID-19 plan to protect yourself from infection and prepare for what to do if you get sick.


Information on this page can help you build a COVID-19 plan for preventing, diagnosing, and treating COVID, so you know what to do and can act quickly if you’re exposed, develop symptoms, or test positive and when COVID-19 levels are increasing in your community.

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


A few weeks ago, the federal government announced plans to end the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency on May 11, 2023. COVID-19 remains a public health priority, so this doesn’t mean that CDC will stop tracking COVID-19 and sharing data. Most CDC COVID-19 data activities won’t be directly affected, but there will be changes—learn about them in the COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review.

COVID-19 Community Levels

CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.


U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Updated CDC Recommendations for Respiratory Viruses - 7/2/2024

This message includes updates on respiratory viruses from CDC. Received this email from a friend? Sign up now View this email in your web br...