Monday, October 26, 2020

Toolkit for Youth Sports

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October 26, 2020
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
image of youth sports poster with words stay safe on and off the field

Toolkit for Youth Sports 

CDC’s Toolkit for Youth Sports includes resources and tools to help youth sports administrators, coaches, and parents protect their teams and players and communicate with their communities. The Toolkit includes guidance and planning documents, web resources, FAQs, posters, fact sheets, sample social media posts and related videos. 

concept illustration of COVID-19 virus

How COVID-19 Spreads

COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly through close contact from person to person, usually between people who are within about 6 feet of each other. People who are infected but don’t show symptoms also can spread the virus to others. Some infections can be spread by exposure to the virus in small droplets and particles that can linger in the air from minutes to hours. Under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than 6 feet away. These transmissions occurred within enclosed spaces that had inadequate ventilation, and sometimes the infected person was breathing heavily while singing or exercising, for example. But available data indicate that it is much more common for the virus that causes COVID-19 to spread through close contact with a person who has been infected. 

carved pumpkin and Halloween lights

Halloween 

Many traditional Halloween activities can be high-risk for spreading viruses. There are several safer, alternative ways to participate in Halloween. Carving or decorating pumpkins with members of your household, carving or decorating pumpkins outside, at a safe distance, with neighbors or friends, and having a virtual Halloween costume contest are all lower risk Halloween-related activities. If you may have COVID-19 or you may have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should not participate in in-person Halloween festivities and should not give out candy to trick-or-treaters. 

illustration of man holding forehead with virus floating around

Similarities and Differences between Flu and COVID-19

Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus, and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. In addition, COVID-19 seems to spread more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It also can take longer before people show symptoms, and people can be contagious for a longer time. Another important difference is that while is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19, there is a vaccine to protect against flu—and this year, getting your flu shot is more important than ever. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus. 

poster with text Please wear a mask and image of woman wearing pink mask

Toolkit for Businesses & Workplaces

CDC’s Toolkit for Businesses and Workplaces offers guidance and tools to help business owners protect their customers and employees. General business FAQs are included as a resource, as well as links to web resources and planning documents. 

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

As of October 26, 2020

In the United States, there have been 8,617,022 confirmed cases of COVID-19 detected through U.S. public health surveillance systems in 50 states and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Northern Marianas Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands. 

CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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Tuesday, October 20, 2020

8 Things to Know about Vaccine Planning

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October 20, 2020
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
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8 Things to Know about Vaccine Planning 

There is currently no authorized or approved vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the United States; however, the U.S. government’s Operation Warp Speed program has been working since the pandemic started to make a COVID-19 vaccine available as soon as possible. There may be a limited supply of COVID-19 vaccines before the end of 2020. If there is limited supply, some groups may be recommended to get a COVID-19 vaccine first. Find out the 8 things you need to know about vaccine planning. 

illustration of lady coughing and mask stopping droplets with the words cloth barrier

Considerations for Wearing Masks

CDC recommends that you wear masks in public settings around people who don’t live in your household and when you can’t stay 6 feet away from others. Masks help stop the spread of COVID-19 to others.  This recommendation is based on what we know about the role respiratory droplets play in the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19, paired with emerging evidence from clinical and laboratory studies showing masks reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth. COVID-19 spreads mainly among people who are within about 6 feet of one another, so the use of masks is particularly important in settings where social distancing is hard to maintain. 

tourist woman with mask using phone and sitting

Travel during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Travel increases your chances of getting and spreading COVID-19. Your chances of getting COVID-19 while traveling also depend on whether you and those around you take steps to protect yourself and others, such as wearing masks and staying 6 feet away from people outside your household. Airports, bus stations, train stations, and rest stops are all places travelers can be exposed to the virus in the air and on surfaces. These are also places where it can be hard to keep your distance from others. In general, the longer you are around a person with COVID-19, the more likely you are to get infected. 

image of How to Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19 poster

Test for Current Infection

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. People who have symptoms of COVID-19, people who have been within 6 feet of someone with confirmed COVID-19 for a total of at least 15 minutes, and people who have been asked or referred by a healthcare provider may need to be tested for COVID-19. If you do get tested, you should stay home until you get your test results and follow the advice of your health care provider or a public health professional. If you test negative for COVID-19, it means you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing, or that your sample was collected too early in your infection. If you have symptoms later, you may need another test to determine if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. Remember, you can be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and then get infected and spread the virus to others. 

mask, part of keyboard and hand sanitizer on desk

How to Protect Yourself and Others in the Workplace

If you have or think you have symptoms, or have tested positive for COVID-19, stay home and find out what to do if you are sick and when you can be around others. If you are well, but you have a sick family member or recently had close contact with someone with COVID-19, notify your supervisor and follow CDC-recommended precautions. Other steps to protect yourself and others include monitoring your health and being alert for symptoms, and wearing a mask in public settings. 

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

As of October 20, 2020

In the United States, there have been 8,188,585 confirmed cases of COVID-19 detected through U.S. public health surveillance systems in 50 states and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Northern Marianas Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands. 

CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Tips on Celebrating Martin Luther King Day

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...