Monday, May 10, 2021

How to Talk About COVID-19 Vaccines with Friends and Family

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
May 10, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Two people talking on cell phones

How to Talk About COVID-19 Vaccines with Friends and Family

COVID-19 vaccines are new, and it’s normal for people to have questions about them. The sheer amount of information—and misinformation—about COVID-19 vaccines can be overwhelming to anyone. You can help by listening without judgement and identifying the root of their concerns. Acknowledge their emotions so they know they have been heard. Ask open-ended questions to explore their concerns, ask permission to share information, and help them find their own reason to get vaccinated. 

People wearing a mask correctly with green check marks by their heads

Masks and Health

Studies on the effects of wearing masks have shown there is no change in oxygen or carbon dioxide levels when people wear cloth and surgical masks while resting and exercising. The studies included healthy hospital workers, older adults, and adults with COPD. Although sometimes uncomfortable, masks were found to be safe even when exercising. 



New edition out now. Find the latest data in CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

Following a rapid rise in COVID-19 vaccination rates, U.S. vaccination progress is beginning to slow. While more than 8 in 10 people ages 65 and older have received at least one dose of vaccine, only about 1 in 3 people ages 18 to 29 have. Everyone 16 and older is currently eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine and can benefit from the protection it offers themselves and others. Get vaccinated as soon as you can. Subscribe to get CDC’s COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review sent to your inbox every Friday. 



COVID-19 Science Update Stay on top of the latest research Bit.ly/COVID19_ScienceUpdate

CDC’s COVID-19 Science Update

As we learn more about COVID-19, CDC is working hard to ensure you have access to the latest information on the pandemic, the virus, and its variants. CDC’s COVID-19 Science Update links to new COVID-19-related studies and provides summaries of key findings, methods, and implications from these peer-reviewed and preprint articles.  


people celebrating outside with masks on

Large Gatherings

Large gatherings bring together many people from multiple households in a private or public space. Large gatherings are often planned events with a large number of guests and invitations. Attending gatherings to celebrate graduations and other end of the school year events makes you more likely to get or spread COVID-19. The safest way to celebrate this year is virtually, with people who live with you, or outside while taking prevention measures. 



Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

May 10, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 32,543,257 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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Monday, May 3, 2021

Choosing Safer Activities

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
May 3, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
people enjoying grilling food outside

Choosing Safer Activities 

If you are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you can start doing many things that you had stopped doing because of the pandemic. Outdoor visits and activities are safer than indoor activities, and fully vaccinated people can participate in some indoor events with little risk. Fully vaccinated people can attend a small, outdoor gathering with fully vaccinated and unvaccinated people, as well as eat at outdoor restaurants with friends from multiple households. 

woman holding tablet computer and pointing to throat

People with Certain Medical Conditions

Adults of any age with certain conditions can be more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19. Older adults are more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19 as well. More than 80% of COVID-19 deaths occur in people over age 65, and more than 95% of COVID-19 deaths occur in people older than 45. Preventive measures for COVID-19 (including vaccination, wearing a mask and social distancing) are important especially if you are older or have multiple or severe health conditions. If you have a medical condition, speak with your healthcare provider about steps you can take to manage your health and risks. 



COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review Travel Considerations COVID-19 Across the Globe

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

CDC is monitoring COVID-19 cases, variants, and vaccinations across the globe. If you are traveling, make sure you understand the situation with COVID-19 where you are going so you can travel as safely as possible. Read more in the COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review.



woman wearing mask looking out airplane window

Domestic Travel During COVID-19

Fully vaccinated travelers are less likely to get and spread COVID-19. CDC recommends delaying travel until you are fully vaccinated, because travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. People who are fully vaccinated with an FDA-authorized vaccine or a vaccine authorized for emergency use by the World Health Organization can travel safely within the United States. Fully vaccinated travelers do not need to get tested before or after travel unless their destination requires it. Fully vaccinated travelers do not need to self-quarantine, but should still follow CDC’s recommendations for travel, including:

  • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth
  • Stay 6 feet from others and avoid crowds
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer

If you are not fully vaccinated and must travel, follow CDC’s recommendations for unvaccinated people.


You are essential. I got my COVID-19 vaccine! Getting a COVID-19 vaccine adds one more layer of protection.

Essential Workers COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit

Essential workers like police officers, firefighters, and people working in education, child care centers, and grocery stores maintain the services and functions that U.S. residents depend on daily. CDC designed a toolkit to help employers educate essential workers about COVID-19 vaccines, raise awareness about the benefits of vaccination, and address common questions and concerns. 



Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

May 3, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 32,228,003 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

How to Talk About COVID-19 Vaccines with Friends and Family

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...