Monday, January 24, 2022

Free At-Home COVID-19 Tests

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
January 24, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Illustration of COVID-19 Test, swabs and indicator with text COVID-19 Self-test

Free At-Home COVID-19 Tests

Every home in the United States is eligible to order 4 free at-⁠home COVID-⁠19 rapid antigen tests. Orders will usually ship in 7-12 days. These tests give results within 30 minutes (no lab drop-off required).


COVID-19 self-tests (also referred to as home tests or over-the-counter tests) are one of many risk-reduction measures, along with vaccination, masking, and physical distancing, that protect you and others by reducing the chances of spreading COVID-19.


Self-tests can be taken at home or anywhere, are easy to use, and produce rapid results. You can use self-tests, regardless of vaccination status, or whether or not you have symptoms.


Follow all the manufacturer’s instructions for performing the test.



Woman holding cup of tea

Caring for Someone Sick at Home

Learn what to do when someone has symptoms of COVID-19 or when someone has been diagnosed with the virus. For most people, symptoms last a few days, and people usually feel better after a week.


Make sure the person who is sick drinks a lot of fluids and rests.


Use CDC’s self-checker tool to help you make decisions about seeking appropriate medical care.


Look for emergency warning signs and if someone shows these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately.


The person who is sick should wear a mask when they are around other people. Caregivers should wear a mask and ask the sick person to put on a mask before entering the room.


Clean and disinfect your home to remove germs and reduce their spread.


Wash your hands often.


Caregivers should stay home and monitor their health for COVID-19 symptoms while caring for the person who is sick.


Illustration of man and child standing together wearing masks

COVID-19 Vaccines for Children and Teens

Getting a COVID-19 vaccine can help protect children ages 5 years and older from getting COVID-19.


Vaccinating children can help protect family members, including siblings who are not eligible for vaccination and family members who may be at increased risk of getting very sick if they are infected.


Vaccination can also help keep children from getting seriously sick even if they do get COVID-19.


Vaccinating children ages 5 years and older can help keep them in school and help them safely participate in sports, playdates, and other group activities.


Before recommending COVID-19 vaccination for children, scientists conducted clinical trials with thousands of children and no serious safety concerns were identified. Learn more about the process of developing, authorizing, and approving COVID-19 vaccines.


Teens ages 12 to 17 should receive the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot at least 5 months after completing their Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 primary series. Currently, a booster shot is not recommended for children younger than 12.


New Edition Out Now! Friday, January 21, 2022 In this week's edition: - Boosters - Updated mask recommendations Find the latest data in CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review Subscribe: bit.ly/CDTsubscribe

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

As of January 20, 2022, 209 million people have received their primary series of a COVID-19 vaccine and more than 82 million people have also gotten their booster. Getting vaccinated, including get boosted when eligible, is our best defense against severe outcomes from COVID-19. Wearing a well-fitting mask is also important to protect yourself and others. 


  


Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

January 24, 2022

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 70,641,725 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC's COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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Tuesday, January 18, 2022

Types of Masks and Respirators

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
January 18, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Illustration of woman wearing n95 mask

Types of Masks and Respirators

Wearing a mask that fits well, is most protective, and that you will wear consistently is a critical public health tool for preventing spread of COVID-19.


Some masks and respirators offer higher levels of protection than others, and some may be harder to tolerate or wear consistently than others. It is most important to wear a well-fitting mask or respirator correctly that is comfortable for you and that provides good protection.


Properly fitted respirators provide the highest level of protection and may be most important for certain higher risk situations, or by some people at increased risk for severe disease.


CDC’s mask recommendations provide information that people can use to improve how well their masks protect them.




Image of girl at school wearing mask and writing

Guidance for COVID-19 Prevention in K-12 Schools

Students benefit from in-person learning, and safely returning to in-person instruction continues to be a priority. Promoting vaccination can help schools safely return to in-person learning as well as extracurricular activities and sports.


CDC recommends universal indoor masking by all* students (ages 2 years and older), staff, teachers, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status.


New CDC guidance has reduced the recommended time for isolation and quarantine periods to five days. For details see CDC’s page on Quarantine and Isolation.


CDC also recommends schools maintain at least 3 feet of physical distance between students within classrooms to reduce transmission risk.


Screening testing, improved ventilation, handwashing, cleaning and disinfection, and staying home when sick are important layers of prevention to keep schools safe.




Illustration of woman wearing mask looking at phone

How to Talk to Your Close Contacts

It’s important for you to tell your close contacts that they may have been exposed to COVID-19 so they can quarantine, get tested, and wear a well-fitting mask.


For COVID-19, a close contact is anyone who was less than 6 feet away from you for a combined total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period. Someone is still considered a close contact even if they were wearing a mask while they were around you.


If they are infected, they could spread COVID-19 starting 2 days before they have any symptoms or test positive. People who are infected but do not show symptoms and those who do not yet have symptoms can spread the virus to others.


Recommendations for close contacts vary depending on whether they are up to date with their COVID vaccinations or had confirmed COVID-19 within the 90 days prior to close contact.


By letting your close contacts know they may have been exposed to COVID-19, you are helping to protect them and everyone around them.


New Edition Out Now! Friday, January 14, 2022 In this week's edition: - Pediatric trends - How to keep kids safe Find the latest data in CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review Subscribe: bit.ly/CDTsubscribe

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations are on the rise across the United States, including among children and adolescents. The highest hospitalization rates among all children are in those ages 4 years and younger, who are not yet eligible for vaccination. Parents, guardians, and people who care for and are around young children can protect them by wearing well-fitting masks and getting vaccinated and boosted.


  


Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

January 18, 2022

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 66,715,937 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC's COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

CDC Recommends COVID-19 Vaccines for Young Children

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...