Monday, June 27, 2022

CDC Recommends COVID-19 Vaccines for Young Children

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
June 27, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Illustration of five people from various ages and ethnicities and the message, who should get vaccinated against COVID-19, everyone ages 6 months and older.

CDC Recommends COVID-19 Vaccines for Young Children


CDC endorsed the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ (ACIP) recommendation that all children 6 months through 5 years of age should receive a COVID-19 vaccine. This expands eligibility for vaccination to nearly 20 million additional children and means that all Americans ages 6 months and older are eligible for vaccination.

Parents and caregivers can get their children 6 months through 5 years of age vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines to better protect them from COVID-19. All children, including children who have already had COVID-19, should get vaccinated.

COVID-19 vaccines have undergone—and will continue to undergo—the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. Parents and caregivers can play an active role in monitoring the safety of these vaccines by signing their children up for V-safe – personalized and confidential health check-ins via text messages and web surveys where they can easily share with CDC how a child feels after getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

Parents can reach out to their doctor, nurse, local pharmacy, or health department, or visit vaccines.gov to see where vaccines for children are available.

Illustration of family with face coverings

Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccination for Children and Teens


For answers to commonly asked questions about COVID-19 vaccination in children and teens, visit Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccination for Children and Teens.

Topics cover:
• Benefits of Vaccinating Your Child
• Safety of COVID-19 Vaccination for Children
• Getting Children Vaccinated
Information for parents and caregivers of children ages 6 months and older is also available at: 6 Things to Know about COVID-19 Vaccination for Children

illustration of a boy holding a soccer ball and a girl holding a book.

CDC Recommends Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine for Children and Adolescents


CDC endorsed the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ (ACIP) recommendation that Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine be used as an option for children ages 6 through 17 years, in addition to its already recommended use in children 6 months through 5 years and adults 18 years and older.

This recommendation reinforces the use of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine as an important tool in the pandemic and provides another vaccine option for children and adolescents. The ACIP recommendation comes after a thorough review of the scientific evidence demonstrating safety and efficacy and supports the use of the vaccine among those 6 through 17 years of age.
CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review, Friday June 24, 2022 - COVID-19 Vaccines for Children Ages 6 Months & Older - Find the latest data in CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review - Subscribe: bit.ly/CDTsubscribe

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


It’s the moment many parents have been waiting for: Children ages 6 months and older are now eligible for COVID-19 vaccines. 

COVID-19 Community Levels


CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.



U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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Monday, June 13, 2022

CDC Rescinds Order Requiring Negative Pre-Departure COVID-19 Test Prior to Flight to the US

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
June 13, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
illustration of passenger jet

CDC Rescinds Order Requiring Negative Pre-Departure COVID-19 Test Prior to Flight to the US


Air passengers will not need to get tested and show the COVID-19 test result or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 prior to boarding a flight to the United States.

The COVID-19 pandemic has now shifted to a new phase, due to the widespread uptake of highly effective COVID-19 vaccines, the availability of effective therapeutics, and the increase of high rates of vaccine- and infection-induced immunity at the population level in the United States.
Each of these measures has contributed to lower risk of severe disease and death across the United States.

CDC continues to recommend that those travelers boarding a flight to the U.S. get tested for current infection with a viral test as close to the time of departure as possible (no more than 3 days) and not travel if they are sick.

man checking phone wearing mask

Before You Travel


Steps to take before you travel:
CDC recommends people 2 years and older properly wear a well-fitting mask or respirator over the nose and mouth in indoor areas of public transportation.

Do NOT travel if:
illustration of vaccine bottle with green check mark overlay with text COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Vaccines for People Vaccinated Outside the United States


For the best protection, CDC recommends everyone stay up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, including people who received a COVID-19 vaccine outside of the United States. A person is up to date with their COVID-19 vaccination when they have received all doses in the primary series and all recommended boosters, when eligible.
Specific recommendations for people vaccinated outside of the United States depend on whether:
  1. The vaccine(s) received are accepted in the United States
  2. The primary series was completed by
  3. A booster dose was received
*CDC does not recommend mixing different COVID-19 vaccines for the primary series but is aware that this is increasingly common in many countries outside of the United States. Therefore, for the interpretation of vaccination records, people who received a mixed primary series have completed the primary series.
CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review, Friday June 10, 2022 - Summer Fun and Safety - Find the latest data in CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review - Subscribe: bit.ly/CDTsubscribe

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


Make sure this summer is a safe one! Check your COVID-19 Community Level when planning activities, consider getting tested before you travel, and remember that being outdoors is safest.  


COVID-19 Community Levels


CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.



U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Finding an Updated Bivalent COVID-19 Booster

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...