Monday, August 30, 2021

School Testing for COVID-19

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
August 30, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Group of children running outside with masks on

School Testing for COVID-19

As schools go back to in-person learning, many offer free, regular COVID-19 testing for students and staff.


Regular testing, along with COVID-19 vaccination, helps protect students, staff, family members, and others who are not currently vaccinated against COVID-19 or are at risk for getting seriously sick from COVID-19. Testing programs help keep students in the classroom and allow them to take part in activities at school they love.



Illustration of vaccine bottles

COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot

COVID-19 vaccines are working very well to prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death, even against the widely spreading Delta variant. However, with the Delta variant, public health experts are starting to see reduced protection against mild and moderate disease. For this reason, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is planning for a booster shot so vaccinated people maintain protection over the coming months.


The goal is for people to start receiving a COVID-19 booster shot beginning in the fall, with individuals being eligible starting 8 months after they received their second dose of an mRNA vaccine (either Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna). This is subject to authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and recommendation by CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).



Women wearing masks and shopping indoors

Daily Activities

If you are fully vaccinated, you can resume many of the activities you did before the pandemic. Even if you are fully vaccinated, you can become infected with the Delta variant and you can spread the virus to others. To reduce the risk of being infected with the Delta variant and possibly spreading it to others, if you are in an area of substantial or high transmission wear a mask indoors in public.


If you are not fully vaccinated, continue to take steps to protect yourself:



Delta variant graphic

The Delta variant is more contagious than previous strains - it may cause more than 2x as many infections. Vaccines protect you from hospitalization, severe infections, and death

Delta Variant: What We Know About the Science

CDC released updated guidance on the need for urgently increasing COVID-19 vaccination coverage and a recommendation for everyone in areas of substantial or high transmission to wear a mask in public indoor places, even if fully vaccinated.


This new guidance is in response to a rapid and alarming rise in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations around the country, reversing a steady decline since January 2021.


New data has also emerged showing that the Delta variant is more infectious and spreads more easily than other variants, even among some vaccinated individuals.



Image of phone with COVID Data Tracker for Friday, August 27, 2021 In this week's edition: Additional doses for immunocompromised people

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

COVID-19 vaccines authorized or approved in the United States are safe and still highly effective at reducing the risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19. Some immunocompromised people don’t always reach the same level of immunity as other vaccinated people. Immunocompromised people who received a two-dose vaccine may benefit from an additional dose of COVID-19 vaccine to help them build more protection. 



Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

August 30, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 38,852,582 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC's COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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Monday, August 16, 2021

COVID-19 Vaccines for Moderately to Severely Immunocompromised People

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
August 16, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Illustration of COVID-19 vaccine bottle with sticker with text I got my COVID-19 vaccine!

COVID-19 Vaccines for Moderately to Severely Immunocompromised People

People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised are especially vulnerable to COVID-19 because they are more at risk of serious, prolonged illness. Studies indicate some immunocompromised people don’t always build the same level of immunity after vaccination the way non-immunocompromised people do.


CDC recommends that people with moderately to severely compromised immune systems receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine at least 28 days after a second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.


CDC does not recommend additional doses or booster shots for any other population at this time.



Delta variant graphic

The Delta variant is more contagious than previous strains - it may cause more than 2x as many infections. Vaccines protect you from hospitalization, severe infections, and death

Delta Variant: What We Know About the Science

The Delta variant is more than 2x as contagious as previous variants. Some data suggest the Delta variant might cause more severe illness than previous strains in unvaccinated persons.


Although breakthrough infections happen much less often than infections in unvaccinated people, individuals infected with the Delta variant, including fully vaccinated people with symptomatic breakthrough infections, can transmit it to others. CDC is continuing to assess data on whether fully vaccinated people with asymptomatic breakthrough infections can transmit.


The greatest risk of transmission is among unvaccinated people who are much more likely to contract and, therefore, transmit the virus.




Woman sitting in chair with mask on with back pain

COVID-19 Vaccines Work

COVID-19 vaccination reduces the risk of COVID-19 and its potentially severe complications. While COVID-19 vaccines are working well, some people who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 will still get sick, because no vaccines are 100% effective. These are called vaccine breakthrough cases. mRNA COVID-19 vaccines have been shown to provide protection against severe illness and hospitalization among people of all ages eligible to receive them. This includes people 65 years and older who are at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19. 



Family grilling outside.

Families and COVID-19

As more people are getting vaccinated and resuming activities they did before the pandemic, parents and caregivers are making hard decisions on how to protect their families. Everyone 12 years and older should get a COVID-19 vaccination to help protect against COVID-19. People who are not fully vaccinated and children under 12 years who are not able to get a COVID-19 vaccine should continue taking steps to prevent getting sick.


To maximize protection from COVID-19, and in particular, the Delta variant, and prevent possibly spreading it to others, everyone, regardless of vaccination status, should wear a mask indoors in public if you are in an area of substantial or high transmission.



Image of phone with COVID Data Tracker for Friday, August 13, 2021 In this week's edition: COVID-19 trends in young people - "Back to School" considerations

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

Severe cases of COVID-19 among children are less common than in older age groups, but pediatric COVID-19 cases and the number of children admitted to hospitals are going up. 


Although vaccination rates among adolescents are rising, children below 12 years old are still not eligible. As states and counties get ready to send students back to school, it’s important for all eligible young people to get vaccinated to protect themselves and others. COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review.



Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

August 16, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 36,720,973 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC's COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...