Tuesday, May 31, 2022

Do You Need a COVID-19 Test?

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
May 31, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Illustration showing a COVID test next to a woman covering her cough or sneeze.

Do You Need a COVID-19 Test?


Review the questions below to determine when to get tested. If you have had COVID-19 in the past 90 days and recovered, you do not need to be tested unless you develop new symptoms.

Do you have COVID-19 symptoms?
Get tested immediately.

Have you had close contact exposure to someone with COVID-19?
Get tested at least 5 days after exposure.

Are you traveling?
Learn more about testing for travel by visiting Travel | CDC

Are you planning to attend an upcoming event or gathering?
Reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19 by getting tested as close to the event date as possible.

Where can I get a test?
Visit your state, tribal, local, or territorial health department’s website for the latest local information on testing.

Many pharmacies and community centers provide access to free COVID-19 tests. Visit Community-Based Testing Centers or the Increasing Community Access to Testing (ICATT) website to find testing locations in your area.

Self-tests
Order free tests at COVIDtests.gov. Free tests are also available through local health departments.

Buy tests online or in pharmacies and retail stores. Private health insurance may reimburse the cost of purchasing self-tests. Visit FDA’s website for a list of authorized tests.

Illustration of woman in her bed with phone in her hand.

Isolation After You Test Positive


People who are confirmed to have COVID-19 or are showing symptoms of COVID-19 need to isolate regardless of their vaccination status. This includes:

• People who have a positive viral test for COVID-19, regardless of whether or not they have symptoms.
• People with symptoms of COVID-19, including people who are awaiting test results or have not been tested.

At home, anyone sick or infected should separate from others, or wear a well-fitting mask or respirator when they need to be around others.

Use CDC’s Quarantine & Isolation tool to help determine how long you need to isolate, quarantine, or take other steps to prevent spreading COVID-19.

Illustration of doctor and patient talking while wearing a face mask. 

Finding COVID-19 Treatments


If you test positive and are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19, treatments are available that can reduce your chances of being hospitalized or dying from the disease.

People who are more likely to get very sick include older adults (ages 50 years or more, with risk increasing with older age), people who are unvaccinated, and people with certain medical conditions, such as a weakened immune system.

Medications to treat COVID-19 must be prescribed by a healthcare provider and started as soon as possible after diagnosis to be effective. Contact a healthcare provider, health clinic, or pharmacist to learn about treatment options, even if your symptoms are mild right now.

Use the Test To Treat locator tool: Test To Treat (hhs.gov) , or call 1-800-232-0233 (TTY 1-888-720-7489) to find a testing location that can provide treatment in your area.

Don’t delay: Treatment must be started within days after you first develop symptoms to be effective.

Who should get a COVID-19 vaccine booster graphic

Who Should Get a COVID-19 Boosters?


Boosters are an important part of protecting yourself from getting seriously ill or dying from COVID-19. They are recommended for most people.


It is never too late to get the added protection offered by COVID-19 boosters.


If you need help scheduling a booster, contact the location that set up your previous appointment.


If you need to get a booster in a location different from where you received your previous vaccination, there are several ways you can find a vaccine provider.


COVID-19 Community Levels


CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.



U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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Monday, May 23, 2022

CDC Strengthens Recommendations and Expands Eligibility for COVID-19 Booster Shots

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
May 23, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Little girl wearing mask showing her vaccination site bandage 

CDC Strengthens Recommendations and Expands Eligibility for COVID-19 Booster Shots


CDC has expanded eligibility of COVID-19 vaccine booster doses to everyone 5 years of age and older, recommending that children ages 5 through 11 years should receive a booster shot 5 months after their initial Pfizer-BioNTech vaccination series.

Vaccination with a primary series among this age group has lagged behind other age groups leaving them vulnerable to serious illness.

CDC has also strengthened its recommendation that those 12 and older who are immunocompromised and those 50 and older should receive a second booster dose at least 4 months after their first.

While older Americans have the highest coverage of any age group of first booster doses, most older Americans received their last dose many months ago, leaving many who are vulnerable without the protection they may need to prevent severe disease, hospitalization, and death.

Illustrated little girl in mask waving.

6 Things to Know about COVID-19 Vaccination for Children


1. COVID-19 vaccination for children is safe.
Ongoing safety monitoring shows that COVID-19 vaccination continues to be safe for children and that the benefits of COVID-19 vaccination outweigh the known and potential risks.

2. Getting vaccinated can help protect children against COVID-19.
COVID-19 vaccination continues to protect children against severe disease, including hospitalization. There is no way to tell in advance how children will be affected by COVID-19. Children with underlying medical conditions are more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19. However, healthy children without underlying medical conditions can also experience severe illness.

3. Children may have some side effects after COVID-19 vaccination.
Side effects may affect your child’s ability to do daily activities, but they should go away within a few days. Side effects are more common after the second shot. Some children have no side effects.

4. A different dosage of the COVID-19 vaccine is given to children.
Children receive a smaller dose of COVID-19 vaccine. COVID-19 vaccine dosage is based on age on the day of vaccination, not by patient weight. This is also true for other routinely recommended vaccines, like hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines.

5. Children who have already had COVID-19 should still get vaccinated.
Emerging evidence indicates that people can get added protection by getting vaccinated after they have been infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.

6. Children can safely receive other vaccines the same day they receive their COVID-19 vaccine.
If multiple vaccines are given at a single visit, each injection will be given in a different injection site, according to recommendations by age.
Patient after receiving booster shot.

Getting Your COVID-19 Booster


COVID-19 vaccine boosters are an important part of protecting yourself from getting seriously ill or dying from COVID-19. They are recommended for most people.

A booster can further enhance or restore protection that might have waned over time after your primary series vaccination.

If you need help deciding when or if you (or your child) can get one or more COVID-19 boosters, visit COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters | CDC and use the decision tool.


It is never too late to get the added protection offered by a COVID-19 booster. Find a vaccine provider.

What to Expect at Your Child's COVID-19 Appointment

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


Getting vaccinated is the best way to avoid getting seriously sick or dying from COVID-19. If you’ve started vaccination but haven’t stayed up to date, make an appointment today. 

COVID-19 Community Levels


CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.



U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Finding an Updated Bivalent COVID-19 Booster

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...