Tuesday, June 22, 2021

We Can Do This Vaccination Campaign

Received this email from a friend? Sign up now

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
June 22, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Image of text over outline of United States We Can Do This

National Vaccine Month of Action

Through July 4, the We Can Do This Campaign is mobilizing national organizations, community-based partners, influencers, celebrities, athletes, and thousands of volunteers across the nation to empower their communities and get more people vaccinated.


How You Can Help

  • Host In-Person or Virtual Events
  • Promote ways to get vaccinated
  • Join the COVID-19 Community Corps


Man swimming

Frequently Asked Questions from Operators or Managers of Pools, Beaches, Waterparks, and other Aquatic Venues

Aquatic venues are popular spots during the summers. Operators have asked how to reduce the spread of COVID-19 when visitors and staff may not be fully vaccinated. They’ve also asked how to encourage mask use and social distancing, and how to improve ventilation. 



COVID Data Tracker chart with text View Trends in Hospitalization and Disease Severity Among Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19

COVID-19 Data Tracker

Did you know? CDC’s COVID Data Tracker allows you to view trends in hospitalizations and disease severity among patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Explore trends broken down by age group, sex, ICU admissions, and more. 



Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

June 21, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 33,368,860 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC's COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Monday, June 14, 2021

National Vaccine Month of Action

Received this email from a friend? Sign up now

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
June 14, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Image of text over outline of United States We Can Do This

National Vaccine Month of Action

Through July 4th, the We Can Do This Campaign is mobilizing national organizations, community-based partners, influencers, celebrities, athletes, and thousands of volunteers across the nation to empower their communities and get more people vaccinated.


How You Can Help

  • Host In-Person or Virtual Events
  • Promote ways to get vaccinated
  • Join the COVID-19 Community Corps


Image with close up of mask that has tightly woven fabric with green check mark in top right corner

How to Wear Masks

CDC recommends that unvaccinated people age 2 and older wear masks in public. For people who are unvaccinated, masks should be worn in addition to staying at least 6 feet apart, especially if indoors around people who don’t live with you. Masks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations. Travelers are not required to wear a mask in outdoor areas of a conveyance, such as on a ferry or the top deck of a bus. 



illustration of vial, specimen bag and swab

Cost of Testing

You can get tested for COVID-19 at no cost. Tests run by public health labs are 100% covered, regardless of whether you have insurance. Uninsured patients may still be charged fees for associated care, so be sure to ask your local health department about getting tested at a public lab where all costs will be covered, including associated care. Even if you’re fully vaccinated, get tested if you have symptoms of COVID-19. If you’re unvaccinated, get tested if you have symptoms, if you’ve been around someone with COVID-19, or have taken part in mass gathering, travel or other activities that make physical distancing difficult. 


Illustration of house with inset of person laying down in bed

Post-COVID Conditions

Although most people with COVID-19 get better within weeks of illness, some people experience post-COVID conditions. Post-COVID conditions are a wide range of new, returning, or ongoing health problems people can experience more than four weeks after first being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. One type of post-COVID condition is Long COVID. Long COVID is a range of symptoms that can last weeks or months after first being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 or can appear weeks after infection. Long COVID can happen to anyone who has had COVID-19, even if the illness was mild, or they had no symptoms. People with long COVID report experiencing different combinations of symptoms, such as fatigue, headache and chest pain. 


New Edition Out Now image of phone with COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review Friday, June 11, 2021 report In this week's edition: Health Equity Find the latest data on CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have left people from some racial and ethnic minority groups at higher risk for COVID-19. Since the beginning of the pandemic, these groups have had higher rates of COVID-19 infection, severe illness, hospitalization, and death. We all have a part in helping to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and ensuring everyone can be as healthy as possible. Read more about COVID-19 and health equity in the COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review



Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

June 14, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 33,292,045 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC's COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Monday, June 7, 2021

COVID-19 Vaccines for Children and Teens

Received this email from a friend? Sign up now

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
June 7, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Teen with mask walking dog in park and teen running in background

COVID-19 Vaccines for Children and Teens

CDC recommends COVID-19 vaccination for everyone ages 12 and older. Learn more about what you and your child or teen can do when you have been fully vaccinated. Children 12 and older are able to get the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine. Search vaccines.gov, text your zip code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233 to find locations near you. 

Four college students walking together on campus

Colleges, Universities and Higher Learning

Institutions of higher education can help slow the spread of COVID-19 by providing information about and offering COVID-19 vaccination, promoting vaccine trust and confidence, and making getting vaccinated easy and convenient. CDC has updated guidance for IHEs about COVID-19 vaccination and prevention strategies for IHEs, whether everyone is fully vaccinated or not. 


Illustration of vial of vaccine and sticker with text I got my COVID vaccine!

Myths and Facts About COVID-19 Vaccines

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Accurate vaccine information is critical and can help stop common myths and rumors. It can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. Before considering vaccine information on the Internet, check that the information comes from a credible source and is updated on a regular basis. 


New Edition Out Now image of phone with COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review Friday, June 4, 2021 report In this week's edition: Trends in adolescent hospitalization Adolescent vaccination Find the latest data on CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

Young people are less likely to be hospitalized for COVID-19 than adults, but cases of severe disease have been documented in adolescents ages 12-17. Recent increases in COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates and the potential for severe disease in this age group reinforce the need for vaccination and other prevention strategies. Read more about adolescent COVID-19 trends and considerations for summer activities in the COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review



Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

June 7, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 33,193,680 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC's COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
Questions or Problems  |  Unsubscribe

Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...