Monday, April 26, 2021

What to Do If You Received the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
April 26, 2021
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Protect against COVID-19. A safe and effective vaccine to protect against COVID-19 is now available.

What to Do If You Received the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine

After a temporary pause, CDC and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommend use of Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen (J&J/Janssen) COVID-19 Vaccine resume in the United States. A review of all available data at this time shows that the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine’s known and potential benefits outweigh its known and potential risks. However, women under 50 years old should be aware of the rare but increased risk of the adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS), and that there are other COVID-19 vaccine options available for which this risk has not been seen. CDC and FDA will continue to monitor the safety of all COVID-19 vaccines. 

Image with map of globe with title Track Variants across the globe on COVID Data Tracker

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

Understanding variants of the virus that cause COVID-19 and their spread can help stop the virus. Track COVID-19 variants across the globe on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker. 



Chalk board with Summer Camp written on it

Guidance for Operating Youth and Summer Camps During COVID-19

Youth and summer camps can play an important role in the lives of children, including supporting their social, emotional, and physical development. Updated CDC guidance can help camp administrators operate while preventing the spread of COVID-19 and protecting campers, their families, staff, and communities. Camp administrators, in collaboration with state, local, territorial, and tribal health officials, can adapt these recommendations to meet the unique needs and circumstances of the populations served in youth day camps. 


Safer Ways to Celebrate Spring Events and Holidays

Attending gatherings to celebrate events and holidays increases your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. The safest way to celebrate this year is virtually, with people who live with you, or outside and at least 6 feet apart from others. Safer ways to celebrate include the following.

  • Decorate your home with holiday themed items and banners.
  • Host a video chat party with family and friends to share in the celebration.
  • Plan a special meal inspired by the holiday or event.
  • Have an outdoor celebration with everyone at least 6 feet apart and wearing masks.
  • Watch virtual events and celebrations.

If you plan to celebrate with others, outdoors is safer than indoors. Travel may increase your chance of spreading and getting COVID-19. If you travel, you should still take steps to protect yourself and others. 

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S.

April 26, 2021

US states, territories, and District of Columbia have reported 31,883,289 cases of COVID-19 in the United States.


CDC provides updated U.S. case information online daily.


In addition to cases, deaths, and laboratory testing, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker now has a Vaccinations tab to track distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in your state.

This map shows COVID-19 cases reported by U.S. states, the District of Columbia, New York City, and other U.S.-affiliated jurisdictions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348
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How to Talk About COVID-19 Vaccines with Friends and Family

This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it ...