Monday, May 2, 2022

COVID-19 Preventive Medication

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
May 2, 2022
This message includes updates on the COVID-19 response from CDC. The COVID-19 Outbreak is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
An illustration of a patient wearing a head scarf and sitting in a chair.

COVID-19 Preventive Medication

Evusheld is an investigational medicine that can help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may be eligible for Evusheld if you:
  • Are moderately or severely immunocompromised and may not mount an adequate immune response to COVID-19 vaccination OR have a history of severe allergic reactions to COVID-19 vaccines, and
  • Do not currently have COVID-19 and have not recently had close contact with someone with COVID-19, and
  • Are an adult or adolescent ages 12 years and older weighing at least 88 pounds (40 kg).
Evusheld contains two different antibodies that can help prevent COVID-19. It must be given by your healthcare provider before exposure to COVID-19.

Talk to your healthcare provider to find out if this option is right for you. Even if you receive Evusheld, taking multiple prevention steps, such as wearing a well-fitting mask or respirator and avoiding crowded places, can provide additional layers of protection from COVID-19.

A health care provider talks with patient about COVID-19 treatments and medications.

COVID-19 Treatments and Medications

For people who are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19 infection, medications are available that can reduce the chances of severe illness and death. Other medications can help reduce symptoms and help manage the illness.

People who are more likely to get very sick include older adults (ages 50 years or more, with risk increasing with older age), people who are unvaccinated, and people with certain medical conditions, such as a weakened immune system.

Being vaccinated makes you much less likely to get very sick. Still, some vaccinated people, especially those ages 65 years or older or who have other risk factors for severe disease, may benefit from treatment if they get COVID-19. A healthcare provider will help decide which treatment, if any, is right for each individual.

The FDA has issued emergency use authorizations (EUA) for certain antiviral medications and monoclonal antibodies to treat mild to moderate COVID-19 in people who are more likely to get very sick.

An illustration of variants of the virus that causes COVID-19

What You Need to Know About Variants

Viruses constantly change through mutation and sometimes these mutations result in a new variant of the virus. Some variants emerge and disappear while others persist. New variants will continue to emerge. CDC and other public health organizations monitor all variants of the virus that cause COVID-19 in the United States and globally.


Scientists monitor all variants but may classify certain ones as variants being monitored, variants of interest, variants of concern and variants of high consequence. Some variants spread more easily and quickly than other variants, which may lead to more cases of COVID-19.


Even if a variant causes less severe disease in general, an increase in the overall number of cases could cause an increase in hospitalizations, put more strain on healthcare resources and potentially lead to more deaths.


New Edition Out Now! Friday, April 29, 2022 In this week's edition: - COVID-19 Preventive Medication - Find the latest data in CDC's COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review Subscribe: bit.ly/CDTsubscribe

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

As of April 29, 2022, more than 100 million people in the United States. have received their first COVID-19 booster. Staying up to date with vaccines is the safest way to protect yourself from getting very sick with COVID-19—even if you've already had COVID-19. 

COVID-19 Community Levels

CDC uses COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the disease’s impact on counties and recommend prevention measures.


CDC also tracks cases, laboratory tests, vaccinations, deaths, and other pandemic data and provides them on our COVID Data Tracker.



U.S. map showing COVID-19 Community Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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