Thursday, March 14, 2024

COVID-19 Vaccine Recommendation for Older Adults, International Long COVID Awareness Day, and More

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CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC 24/7: Saving Lives, Protecting People
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
March 14, 2024
This message includes updates on respiratory viruses from CDC.
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Older Adults Now Able to Receive Additional Dose of Updated COVID-19 Vaccine


CDC recommends that adults ages 65 years and older receive an additional updated 2023-2024 COVID-19 vaccine dose. Adults 65 years and older are disproportionately impacted by COVID-19, with more than half of COVID-19 hospitalizations during October 2023 to December 2023 occurring in this age group. The recommendation acknowledges the increased risk of severe disease from COVID-19 in older adults, along with the currently available data on vaccine effectiveness. Data continues to show the importance of vaccination to protect those most at risk for severe outcomes of COVID-19. An additional dose of the updated COVID-19 vaccine may restore protection that has waned since a fall vaccine dose, providing increased protection to adults ages 65 years and older.

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International Long COVID Awareness Day


March 15 is International Long COVID Awareness Day. This year's theme is "Confront Long COVID." It is important to recognize and raise awareness of Long COVID as a real and serious infection-associated chronic condition that has affected millions of people across the United States. CDC and other federal partners and stakeholders are actively working to address gaps in the understanding of Long COVID and the needs of people with Long COVID. Please join us in supporting people with this condition. Together, we can confront Long COVID. 


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CDC study shows effectiveness of RSV immunization for infants 


Early CDC surveillance data show that nirsevimab is 90% effective at preventing hospitalizations associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in babies. These findings support CDC’s current recommendations for administration of nirsevimab for babies younger than 8 months to protect against RSV-associated lower respiratory tract infection during their first RSV season and for children aged 8–19 months at increased risk for severe RSV disease. To reduce the risk of RSV-associated hospitalization, all infants should be protected by maternal RSV vaccination or infant receipt of nirsevimab. New or expecting parents should talk to their providers about RSV and make a plan for the 2024-2025 season. 


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2023–2024 Seasonal Flu Vaccine Effectiveness


A new CDC report provides interim vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates for 2023-2024 flu vaccines in the United States. One VE Network showed:

  • Vaccinated children (6 months-17 years) were 60% less likely to have a flu-related medical visit and 52% less likely to have a flu-related hospitalization.
  • Vaccinated adults (18-64 years) were 52% less likely to have a flu-related medical visit and 40% less likely to have a flu-related hospitalization.
  • Vaccinated adults 65 years and older were 41% less likely to have a flu-related medical visit and 42% less likely to have a flu-related hospitalization.

CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older who has not yet received a flu vaccine this season get vaccinated now.


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COVID-19 Vaccine Recommendation for Older Adults, International Long COVID Awareness Day, and More

This message includes updates on respiratory viruses from CDC. Received this email from a friend? Sign up now View this email in your web br...